Tahoe OGUL list (SOTA-fied)

So for those that do a lot of peak bagging in the Tahoe area you may have heard or read about the Tahoe OGUL list. “Ogul” is the Washoe word for Bighorn Sheep.   That is kind of fitting since Cali/W6 has an award called the California Bighorn Ram
“The Bighorn Ram Award is available to those activators who have accumulated 500 points activating W6 summits.” –W6 ARM.
The Tahoe OGUL list is 63 peaks in the area of Lake Tahoe, Carson Pass, Ebbetts Pass, the Sweetwater range and a few others dotted here and there.  Please note that not every peak on the OGUL list qualifies as a Summits on the Air summit.  SOTA adheres to the P125 meter standard for prominence, and some of the peaks on the OGUL lack the prominence compared to other nearby peaks.  Case in point Basin Peak and it’s proximity to Castle Crags, the prominence is only 337 feet and on the same ridge as Castle Crags.   I will include those peaks as well just for the sake of keeping the list correct as it exists at the OGUL pages but the SOTA Ref will just say “Not in Sota”.

If you would like more information on the history of the Tahoe OGUL list by all means check out http://www.tahoeogul.org/.      Summits on the air can be found at http://sota.org.uk

And now the table:

9735′ / 2967m

Peak Name Elevation SOTA Reference Lat/Lon
Adams Peak 8197′ / 2498m W6/NS-158 39.9106, -120.1001
Anderson Peak 8683′ / 2647m Not SOTA 39.2591, -120.2971
Basin Peak 9015′ / 2748m Not SOTA 39.3822, -120.3645
Black Butte 8030’/2448m W6/NS-170 39.3950, -120.5579
Castle Peak 9103′ / 2775m W6/SN-038 39.3655, -120.3492
Desert Creek Peak 8969′ / 2733m W7N/TR-009 38.6139, -119.3160
Devils Peak 7704′ / 2348m W6/NS-197 39.2824, -120.4406
Dicks Peak 9974′/3040m W6/NS-068 38.9004, -120.1510
Duane Bliss Peak 8658’/2638m W7N/TR-014 38.0806, -119.8781
East Sister 10402′ / 3171m W7N/TR-001 38.5232, -119.2901
Ellis Peak 8740′ / 2664m W6/NS-133 39.0684, -120.198
English Mountain 8373′ / 2552m W6/NS-141 39.4463, -120.5510
Freel Peak 10881′ / 3317m W6/SN-034 39.4463, -120.5510
Genoa Peak 9150′ / 2789m W7N/TR-007 39.0430, -119.8813
Granite Chief 9006′ / 2745m W6/NS-115 39.1983, -120.2868
Haskell Peak 8107′ / 2471m W6/NS-162 39.6624, -120.5522
Hawkins Peak 8107′ / 2471m W6/NS-065 38.7384, -119.8726
Highland Peak 10934′ / 3333m W6/NS-033 38.5438, -119.7558
Jack Peak 9856′ / 3004m Not in SOTA 38.8905, -120.1542
Jeff Davis Peak 8990′ / 2740m W6/NS-114 38.6366, -119.8965
Jobs Peak 10633′ / 3241m W6/NS-047 38.8579, -119.8616
Jobs Sister 10823′ / 3299m Not in SOTA 38.8625, -119.8847
Lookout Peak 9584′ / 2921m W6/NS-088 38.5107, -119.8730
Lyon Peak 8891′ / 2710m Not in SOTA 39.2068, -120.3157
Markleeville Peak 9417′ / 2870m W6/NS-096 38.6617, -119.8979
McConnell Peak 9099′ / 2773m Not in SOTA 38.9485, -120.2430
Middle Sister 10859′ / 3310m W6/ND-004 38.5080, -119.2952
Mokelumne Peak 9332′ / 2844m W6/NS-103 38.5380, -120.0948
Mt Elwell 7812′ / 2381m W6/NS-182 39.7082, -120.6883
Mt Fillmore 7715′ / 2351m W6/NS-194 39.7302, -120.8525
Mt Mildred 8398′ / 2560m W6/NS-142 (Same Ridgeline) SOTA pk is taller 39.1460, -120.3300
Mt Patterson 11673′ / 3558m W6/ND-001 38.4366, -119.3051
Mt Price 9975′ / 3040m W6/NS-377 38.8641, -120.1743
Mt Rose 10776′ / 3285m W7N/WC-001 39.3437, -119.9171
Mt Siegel 9450′ / 2880m W7N/TR-003 38.8896, -119.5016
Mt Lola 9143′ / 2787m W6/NS-111 39.4329, -120.3644
Mt Tallac 9735′ / 2967m W6/SN-036 38.9060, -120.0987
Needle Peak 8971′ / 2734m Not in SOTA 39.2007, -120.3008
Old Man Mountain 7789′ / 2374m W6/NS-184 39.3705, -120.5219
Phipps Peak 9234′ / 2815m Not in SOTA near NS-105 38.9546, -120.1499
Pyramid Peak 9983′ / 3043m W6/NS-067 38.8445, -120.1577
Ralston Peak 9235′ / 2815m W6/NS-108 38.8333, -120.1015
Raymond Peak 10011′, 3051m W6/NS-066 38.6040, -119.8333
Red Lake Peak 10061′ / 3067m W6/NS-062 38.7142, -119.9873
Red Peak 9307′ / 2837m Not in SOTA 38.9254, -120.2214
Reynolds Peak 9690′ / 2954m W6/NS-081 38.5793, -119.8377
Round Top 10380′ / 3164m W6/NS-055 38.6635, -120.0015
Rubicon Peak 9183′ / 2799m Not in SOTA 38.9886, -120.1335
Sierra Buttes 8587′ / 2617m W6/NS-139 39.5937, -120.6460
Signal Peak 7841′, 2390m W6/NS-179 39.3390, -120.5352
Silver Peak 8930′, 2722m Not in SOTA 38.9347, -120.2306
Silver Peak 10774′ / 3284m Not in SOTA 38.5641, -119.7603
Snow Mountain 8014′ / 2443m W6/NS-171 39.2412, -120.4639
Snow Valley Peak 9214′ / 2808m W7N/TR-006 39.1538, -119.8830
South Sister 11339′ / 3456m W6/ND-002 38.4824, -119.3001
Stevens Peak 10061′ / 3067m W6/NS-375 38.7336, -119.9827
Tells Peak 8872′ / 2704m Not in SOTA 38.9600, -120.2545
The Nipple 9340′ / 2847m W6/NS-102 38.6402, -119.9332
Tinker Knob 8949′ / 2728m W6/NS-121 39.2448, -120.2851
Twin Peaks 8878′ / 2706m W6/NS-128 39.1124, -120.2317
Wade Benchmark 9367′ / 2855m Not in SOTA but near W6/NS-100 38.8166, -119.8425
Waterhouse Peak 9497′ / 2895m W6/NS-092 38.7762, -119.9655
Wheeler Peak 11664′ / 3555m Not in SOTA near W6/ND-001 38.4186, -119.2881

Yet another list of peaks I was aware of, but did not really bother to look into until I realized I have completed about 60% of these peaks (as of Nov, 2018) including a lot of the non SOTA peaks.

I may reach out to the Association Managers for W6 and W7N to see if a dual state list based award similar to the Tahoe Ogul pages, but SOTA specific is possible.

Hear you on the next one
73 de N6JFD.

 

Stop going out unprepared! (a note from the SAR perspective)

Been a while since i have blogged about SOTA but I have still been getting out there (365 points so far this year).  Part of that time though has also seen the usual increase in SAR activity.  For those that do not know I am a member of a SAR team located in the Sierra Nevada.  So this is going to be a soapbox post, more for the general public then for SOTA people, and most SOTA people seem to be in the know and I hope they are in the know!  Still think this is worth talking about though as a nice break from a SOTA trip report

When you read an article in your paper/online whatever and it says “hey go check out this NOVICE trail” do a bit more search then what that article supplies.   We’ve had 5 SARS in the past month at a trailhead we maybe see 1 SAR in a year at that this was a direct contributing factor.  Oh I’ll pick on more subjects then just these 5, but we’re going to start here!  It was nice that some local paper/news outlet/whatever covered a trail to help get some exposure for it (or maybe not since increased use means increased damage) but that should not be the end of it from a research perspective.   In the case of this trail maybe ask yourself some other questions like… “This is in the Sierra, what is the elevation, have I ever hiked at this elevation before?”  Will my cellphone and google maps/alltrails/gaia GPS/whatever map app you use be enough in an area that probably does not have cell coverage?  Have I left a plan with someone? That is the one that most people miss.  They do not leave a plan.  What supplies will I need?  sure it’s warm during the day, but at night, when it’s 50, 40, or even down to 30 degrees, if I do end up being over due will I be warm?  Which leads me to my next question, do I have a light?  do I have food, enough water, or a way to treat water if I pull it from the streams?   That water may look cool, clear and tasty, but chances are if it’s in the mountains it’s probably had some marmot fecal matter in it, or donkey/horse where trail crews use pack animals to take supplies in etc.  Unless you want to lose 20-30 pounds FAST, do not drink the water untreated!!!  I will not recommend any product or what to carry beyond perhaps consult the 10 essentials.  Oh and also, IF you are taking your pup figure out things like what is the longest hike I have taken my dog on?  Have I ever had my pup walk on Sierra Granite?   Maybe I need shoes for my dog?  SAR teams technically are not allowed to rescue animals, some districts may try and fudge it via some other various justification like “the owner was not going to leave the animal, so the owner was going to put his/herself in harm”.    Be advised too that if a SAR team comes to help you with your four-legged friend, IF animal services/Humane Society/whatever happens to be in tow there is a chance you might get cited for animal negligence (yes I have seen this happen first hand.  That owner started crying b/c of the overall ordeal and this last minute surprise).  Sorry but as an animal lover, I concur with AS’s action in this case.  The owner should have known better.  ” stated they had never heard of shoes for a dog”

So back on the weather angle for a second, and I think I have ranted on this particular group of subjects in the past, but the employees from a large technology company who own a mapping division who thought it would be a great idea to go bag a 9000 foot peak in the Sierras in January.   They had nothing more then 2 16oz bottles of water each, no food, blue jeans, their company schotzky jackets, and IIRC one individual of that group of three was actually wearing canvas VANs shoes.     If I really need to explain even a few things that are wrong in the above, do yourself (and your local SAR teams) a favor, and stay on the couch.  Sorry if I am sounding elitist, but I’ve seen enough folks not using the massive lump of gray material between their ears that just asking themselves a few basic questions would have saved themselves some possible embarrassment..

So what I will recommend is that you at least understand what the 10 essentials are.  I have heard a few people often refer to this as “some arbitrary list that does no good” and well there is some truth to that statement IF you do not know how to effectively use the items, you can technically survive for a few days with just these supplies.

What are the 10 essentials?  https://www.nps.gov/articles/10essentials.htm

A Pack while not on the list, is needed for carrying this stuff, so might as well put this at the top of the list.  They also do not list some sort of knife (I call out a multi-tool below) but I can do more with a 4 inch full tang blade for survival then I can with a multi-tool.  (Full tang means the entire length of the knife is a single chunk of steel, it’s not a folding knife etc).  If you have to cut on trees to build a shelter you will end up possibly breaking a folding knife etc.).

Navigation:  A cell phone alone will not cut it.  Even with external battery/recharge capabilities, you are going to be in some areas where you may not have access to a cell tower.  (Sometimes you do need Data to pull that map down).  A GPS unit, or even just a paper map is a good back up.   For you weight weenies out there, paper is pretty darn light..  The important thing here is whatever your nav method, KNOW HOW TO USE IT, or it is basically trash in your pack.

SUN PROTECTION: Sunscreen, hat, sunglasses etc.    This is pretty self explanatory, and I’d almost say the sunglasses are more important in winter then summer.

INSULATION – Jacket, hat, gloves, rain shell, and thermal underwear: The weather report may say “0% chance of rain and sunny” but the mountain does not always listen to the weather forecasters.   The mountains are capable of making their own weather, and storms can come up out of no where.  Even in the Sierras in the middle of July it can snow at night and if you are out there with nothing more then shorts and a t-shirt, you are going to have a long, cold, miserable night.

Illumination:  Another one of those “and your cell phone alone will not cut it” items.  I remember once i was backpacking somewhere and I was on a nearby peak to my campsite.   It was nearly sunset (I had run up to watch sunset) and this group of 6 day hikers were just making the summit obviously very tired.   They asked me “how long will it take us to go down?”  I replied with “45 minutes quicker then it took you to go up” (which is true for most people).  I could see that did not settle well with them, and I went into the “and you have a light and warm clothes? it gets cold and dark up here”.   Hit our SAR coordinator via the radio on my way back down the trail to my camp.

First Aid Supplies:  This does not need to be that exhaustive; mole skin, some aspirin, some bandaids etc..basic first aid you might keep in your house.  Not looking for you to be carrying SAM splints and being able to reset a dislocation here, just enough to deal with the minor discomforts that can happen.

Fire: This is one of those, that depending on where you live, I hesitate to say “be able to make a fire AND control it”.  Over the past few years fires in the backcountry end up being banned in a lot of the western states during late summer/fall.   Reality is, if you have a jacket, and the rest of the stuff on the list you can go without a fire.   While I do love a good campfire I’d rather my house be standing then burned down from a wildfire I caused while trying to stay warm while lost.  The Cedar Fire (2003, San Diego) and Rim Fire (Groveland/Yosemite 2013) which is the 5th largest in CA history as well as many others were all started by individuals who were lost and cold, and their fires got out of control.    There are others but most folks will have heard of these (if they live in California).   Again, I’ll re-iterate, if the fire danger is anything but Green/Low use your clothing layers that are in this list and skip the fire.  Winter, by all means do what you can to stay warm.

REPAIR KIT AND TOOLS – Duct tape, knife, screwdriver, and scissors:  A multi-tool is enough there, and if you happen to use trekking poles, that is a great way to hold duct tape for emergency use.

NUTRITION – Food:  You may only think you are heading out for a couple of hours, but part of being out there is enjoying nature and taking some time, so might as well have enough food to last you 24 hours just in case, besides a salami and cheese tastes great when hanging by that alpine lake.  Sure we can go 5 days without eating, but if it’s cold out, you’ll stay warmer if you have some extra calories, even something as simple as a few extra trail bars can make a difference.

HYDRATION – Water and water treatment supplies:  I think I ranted on this above, just because that water looks clean does not mean it is. Giardia, Cryptosporidia etc. They all exist in our water.   If your destination is a popular one, you can believe your water will be contaminated with something.

EMERGENCY SHELTER – Tent, space blanket, tarp, and bivy:  This can be anything from a Bothy bag, to the emergency blankets that are the size a deck of cards, reality is, if you have your emergency clothing listed above, you can survive the night (unless you are stuck in torrential rain/heavy snow).

That is the list of things that most backcountry travelers will tell you you cannot live without (with the exception of building a campfire if in a high fire danger area).    However it is one thing to carry it, it’s totally another thing to know how to use it when it’s time.   So take the time to understand what you are carrying and why.

So when you get to that trailhead, it’s worth it to sign the permit/log book on where you plan on hiking. SAR teams do have access to the permit box/log.  Heck I was in the backcountry once when a wildfire broke out, and because the NPS had my travel plans on the permit, they used that to call my cell phone (which I was not carrying on that trip) and leave a message asking me to call them when I got out of the BC.   We have done similar.   Since that time, I now carry a radio, and I do have it open on part 90 frequencies so I can listen to fire crews in the field, and if needed get beta on where I need to go to stay safe.   (as an amateur radio operator I would never advise anyone to just pick up a radio and start yelling into the microphone beyond to say “do what you have to do to ensure the security of human life and limb”).   The FCC is not going to fine you if you found someone injured and called “SOS” on whatever frequency they might have programmed in.

While I am at it, I might as well mention and IF you do get lost, STAY PUT!   There is a wonderful thing that is being taught to kids now: “If you get lost ‘S.T.O.P’  Stop. Think. Observe. Plan.    If you did leave your plan with someone, and you are not that far off your intended path by staying put we will be able to find you quicker.

 

Good luck and enjoy the nature, be safe, be prepared and PLEASE LEAVE NO TRACE!

 

 

 

 

 

N6JFD/AE is now live :D

I spent the last year reading the big green book a couple of times, and studied the exam pool questions (especially E7 and E9 those gave me the most trouble) easily a hundred times.    I finally ponied up to take my Extra, and passed on the first try.  Only missed 7.    That was my first goal for 2018, and I’ll be able to operate full CEPT in Germany in April and UK in June/July.  Next up..starting back in hot and heavy on CW…I want to be able to activate a peak via CW by the summer time!

That is all -73.. N6JFD

 

My Winter SOTA packing list

I’m sure most of the SOTA folks out there who go summiting in the winter have the right gear.  This is intended for those that may be new at the venturing in the cold and limited daylight of the November – March month time frame in alpine areas.  Reality is, this is just paying homage to the old Boy Scout mindset of be prepared (I myself was never a scout) but just thru dumb luck, memorizing the Mountaineering bible and years of playing I’ve come to always carry the following things so I never have to rely on the kindness of strangers, search and rescue or more dumb luck. The goal here is that I could survive for 24 hours (minimum) IF things did not go to plan.  As always though YMMV based upon where you are, experience, tolerance to cold, weather etc.  To be clear, I have done a ton of hiking and backpacking in the winter, so this list is based upon that..This will be the first year where SOTA is going to be the primary goal of my outings this winter.  Who knows, I may even get some summits via snow machine, but not sure yet..

For those that know me, or just looking at my TOC you can see I spend a lot of time in W6/NS and W6/SN, and I do love venturing out into the snow (although 2017/2018 is not shaping up to be very wintry at this rate)..but it’s conditions like this that I would consider are more dangerous for the inexperienced mountain topper.  To illustrate the point, during the winter of 2014/2015 (the worst year of the California drought) we had a SAR where some folks on a low snow year thought climbing Pyramid Peak (W6/NS-094, and no not doing SOTA) was a great idea in Vans and blue jeans with 3 16 oz bottles of water between the group and NO food or other supplies.  Needless to say we found them…200 yards from the road, they never made it far even though they wandered thru the woods for 8 hours.  A lot could be said about their preparation, but the main point I am looking to illustrate here is do not let benign conditions, and technology create a false sense of security.  This is not an isolated incident by any stretch of the imagination.

I use my older backcountry snowboarding pack (DaKine poacher 45L) as it has plenty of room.  I am still using a lowepro camera case to carry my SOTA gear, it’s not broken yet, and I see no need to replace it as my entire HF kit and amish logbook (pencil and paper) all fit.  This is also my base SAR pack for what it is worth.

I’ll link a short write up on my radio gear separately but like most of us it is probably an ever evolving list of toys so it will be out of date tomorrow.

I am a bit OCD when it comes to organization in my backpack, a stuff sack for every purpose, and every purpose with a stuff sack (also referred to as ditty bag, or just bag).

I will start with what I consider my second most important bag… I call it my “butter bag”:

Content of the butter bag

 

 

It basically carries Justen’s butters and trail bar of choice (currently for me is the Tahoe Trail Bar).  I smear the butter on the trail bar for 500 calories of awesomeness (pretty sure i’ve talked about that before).  I call it important, and in winter I put a bit of priority around food..(warmth always comes first, but food is harder to come by in the snow and snow can be melted for water).

I have enough bars and gooey peanut butters that I could survive 72 hours if I had to.

I also carry a not quite full cook kit:

The stove and such are in the mesh bag, edibles are in the ziplock..
  • snowpeak gigastove and canisiter.  note: A single 110ml canister lasts for a week of boiling water.  IF my stove ever gives out I may move to a Jetboil system, but my stove is running rock solid at the moment so no need to replace it.  I have had it since 2003.   In the cold warm the canister before trying to use it.
  • GSI outdoors Micro dualist cook kit.
  • bag of soups, teas, instant coffee for warmth.
  • sometimes I carry a full thermos of hot water too just to skip cook time.

 

 

 

 

 

So next up is my clothing.  My clothing is based upon my known tolerance for cold, and I tend to run warm. I use a 13L stuff sack for my clothes.  Other things get in and out but these are always in this sack:

  • Synthetic puffy pants (not putting these on is a mistake I make often for some stupid reason).
  • Patagonia R1
  • Pair of wool socks: one thing I did learn from my dad was take care of your feet and everything else will be all right.
  • Pair of lightweight legging base layer (capilene 1)
  • Down jacket based upon possible summit temps. I have a lightweight OR 600 fill down sweater as well as a heavier Cloudveil 800 fill down jacket.

Some things you may not see in pictures but that always are somewhere in my pack

  • balaclava (I picked up the coolest merino wool balaclava made by a Japanese company named Oyuki last winter.
  • gloves that are weather specific
  • headlamp, spare batteries
  • spare radio battery
  • knife
  • tyvek
  • 2 person bothy bag (these things are great wind break shelters that pack down VERY small).  I would not want to backpack for a week in one, but I have spent the night in mine just to see what it was like.
  • GPS as well as map and compass  (I still am not willing to trust a cell phone as a means of navigation..I rescue way to many people who do). 1 extra set of batteries.  A pair of Duracell Quantums last about 24 hours of constant use in my GPSMap62s
  • fire starter (#1 priority in survival is staying warm).
  • basic first aid kit
  • water treatment in case I do find running water
  • Avalanche kit (beacon, shovel, probe).  Never head to avy country without them.
  • Rain jacket for wind break
  • Ziplocks and some Toilet Paper (please if you have to drop a deuce in the cold do not leave it).

 

Other things you will see in the pictures at the bottom include:

  • Ice Axe
  • Sit pad..part of staying warm is get off the snow
  • crampons if conditions require it
  • snowshoes, but they are not being carried, they are being worn.  I have done used my backcountry snowboard for SOTA too.

And that is it.  all told the base weight is about 20lb, but winter is a time where I would definitely rather have it and not need it then start yelling CQ SOS and hoping someone gets to me soon.   What I can share is in the county where I volunteer, from the time you call 911 to the time we are at the trailhead and ready to move to you is about 2 hours.  It takes time to get the right folks involved and the teams built, blah blah.  Once we are on the move we move at anywhere from 2.5mph to 4mph; however snow does slow groups down.   So again, better to have it and not need it then test fate and get REAL COLD!

Given my summit success during the late running winter and snow coverage in early 2017 I plan to do some more summits this winter (and take advantage of that winter bonus to get my points per activation up).

-73 and hope to hear you out there in the coming months